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Monday, December 11, 2017

Violet Wood, British supercentenarian, oldest person in the United Kingdom died she was 112

Violet Jane Wood was a British supercentenarian who was the oldest person in the United Kingdom for almost a year before her death at the age of 112 years, 180 days.

 (2 September 1899 – 29 February 2012)

Violet Jane Hodges was born in Faversham, Kent, England. She was married to Harry Wood for 62 years until his death at the age of 92.
She drove a car until she was 80 years old, and worked on a farm all of her life.[1] She credited her longevity to eating toast and pickles.[2]
Her sisters Bertha and Marjorie lived to the ages of 106 and 99 respectively.[1][2][2][3][4] She was succeeded in this title by Grace Jones.
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P. K. Narayana Panicker, Indian welfare worker, President of the Nair Service Society died he was 81


P. K. Narayana Panicker (was the President and General Secretary of The Nair Service Society (NSS)  died he was 81. He is the second-longest-serving general secretary of the organization (after founder Mannath Padmanabhan), who has served 28 years in the post.[2] He was an advocate by profession, who came to the front row of the organization in 1977 as its treasurer and later became General secretary in 1984.

(15 August 1930 – 29 February 2012[1])  
 
Narayana Panicker was born on August 27, 1930 as the first son and third child of the seven kids of Changanassery Vazhappally Padinjarubhagam Pichamathil A.N. Veluppilla and Lakshmikutty Amma. He completed his education at Saint Theresas School, Perunna School, Changanassery S. B college and Ernakulam Govt. Law College.[3] He has worked as a Teacher and Advocate during the course of his career.[1][4]
He has also worked as the Chairman of Changanassery Municipality, member of Kerala University Senet, member of M.G. University Syndicate, member of Guruvayoor Devaswam and also as president of Changanassery Lions Club.[3] In 1977, he was elected as the treasurer of Nair Service Society. On New Year's Day in 1984, he became the General Secretary of NSS, succeding Kidangoor Gopalakrishna Pillai.[3][5] He continued in office until 2011, when he was succeeded by his assistant secretary G. Sukumaran Nair. He is the second-longest served General Secretary of N.S.S. He was elected as the President of N.S.S. in 2011.
Panicker achieved a rare feat by dying on Leap Year Day - February 29, 2012.[6] He died of age-related complications at his home around 2 PM that day. He was aged 81 at the time of his death. His health has been deteriorating for a long time. He was also the serving President of Nair Service Society when he died, having elected less than a year ago. His dead body was kept for public view in the N.S.S. headquarters in Perunna and was cremated with full state honours at his home premises. He is survived by three sons - Satheesh Kumar, Jagadeesh Kumar and Ranjith Kumar. His wife Savithri Amma predeceased him in 2006.

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Sheldon Moldoff, American comic book artist (Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman), died from kidney failure he was 91

Sheldon "Shelly" Moldoff [1] was an American comics artist best known for his early work on the DC Comicscharacters Hawkman and Hawkgirl, and as one of Bob Kane's primary "ghost artists" (uncredited collaborators) on the superhero Batman died from kidney failure he was 91. He co-created the Batman supervillains Poison Ivy, Mr. Freeze, the second Clayface, and Bat-Mite, as well as the original heroes Bat-Girl, Batwoman, and Ace the Bat-Hound. Moldoff is the sole creator of the Black Pirate. Moldoff is not to be confused with fellow Golden Age comics professional Sheldon Mayer.

(April 14, 1920 – February 29, 2012)

Born in Manhattan, New York City[2] but mostly raised in The Bronx, he was introduced to cartooning by future comics artist Bernard Baily, who lived in the same apartment house as Moldoff. "I was drawing in chalk on the sidewalkPopeye and Betty Boop and other popular cartoons of the day—and he came by and looked at it and said, 'Hey, do you want to learn how to draw cartoons?' I said, 'Yes!' He said, 'Come on, I'll show you how to draw.'"[3]

Moldoff sold his first cartoon drawing at age 17. "My first work in comic books was doing filler pages for Vincent Sullivan, who was the editor at National Periodicals",[4] one of the three companies, with Detective Comics Inc. and All-American Publications, that eventually merged to form the modern-day DC Comics. Moldoff's debut was a sports filler that appeared on the inside back cover of the landmark Action Comics #1 (June 1938), the comic book that introduced Superman.[5]

During the late-1930s and 1940s Golden Age of comic books, Moldoff became a prolific cover artist for the future DC Comics. His work includes the first cover of the Golden Age Green Lantern, on issue #16 (July 1940) of All-American's flagship title All-American Comics, featuring the debut of that character created by artist Martin Nodell.[5] Moldoff created the character Black Pirate (Jon Valor) in Action Comics#23 (April 1940),[5] and became one of the earliest artists for the character Hawkman (created by Gardner Fox and Dennis Neville,[5] though sometimes misattributed to Moldoff). Moldoff drew the first image of the formerly civilian character Shiera Sanders in costume as Hawkgirl in All Star Comics #5,[6] based on Neville's Hawkman costume design.
Beginning with Flash Comics #4 (April 1940), Moldoff became the regular Hawkman artist, following Neville's departure from the feature the issue before.[5]He drew the Hawkman portions of the Justice Society of America stories published in All Star Comics as well.[7][8] Moldoff recalled in 2000 that All-American publisher Max Gaines

Drafter into World War II military service in 1944, Moldoff returned to civilian life in 1946, drawing for Standard, Fawcett, Marvel and Max Gaines' EC Comics. For EC he drew Moon Girl, continuing with that character for Bill Gaines.[9]
When superhero comics went out of fashion in the postwar era, Moldoff became an early pioneer in horror comics, packaging two such ready-to-prints titles in 1948. He recalled in 2000 that, "I had shown This Magazine Is Haunted and Tales of the Supernatural to [Fawcett Comics'] Will Lieberson before I showed them to [EC Comics'] Bill Gaines, because I trusted Will Lieberson much more. He showed it to the big guys at Fawcett, and he said, 'Shelly, Fawcett doesn't want to get into horror now; they don't want to touch that'".[3]
Moldoff then did approach Gaines with the package, signing a contract stipulating that he would be paid a royalty percentage if the books were successful. Several months later, when EC's Tales From the Crypt hit the newsstands, Gaines reneged on the deal, Moldoff recalled in 2000, with EC attorney Dave Alterbaum threatening to blacklist Moldoff if he took legal action.[3] Afterward, said Moldoff, "Will Lieberson said, 'Let me bring it back to Fawcett again, and see if they'll take the title'. And so they did; they took This Magazine Is Haunted and Worlds of Fear and then Strange Suspense Stories. What they did was pay me $100 for the title, and give me as much work as I wanted, and I also did the covers. So that went on that way".[3]
Moldoff, who received no royalty there, either, created the cadaverous host Doctor Death.

In 1953, Moldoff became one of the primary Batman ghost artists who, along with Win Mortimer and Dick Sprang, drew stories credited to Bob Kane, following Kane's style and under Kane's supervision. While Sprang ghosted as a DC employee, Moldoff, in a 1994 interview given while Kane was alive, described his own clandestine arrangement:

Moldoff and various writers created several new characters for the Batman franchise including the Batmen of All Nations,[10]Ace the Bat-Hound,[11] the original Batwoman,[12] the Calendar Man,[13] Mr. Freeze,[14] Bat-Mite,[15] the original Bat-Girl,[16]and the second Clayface.[17] Most of these characters were phased-out in 1964 after a change in editors. Gardner Fox and Moldoff revived the Riddler in Batman #171 (May 1965).[18] Other Batman foes introduced by Moldoff include Poison Ivy[19]and the Spellbinder.[20]
Moldoff was let go by DC in 1967, along with Golden Age artists George Papp and Wayne Boring.[21] His final Batman stories were published in Batman #199 and Detective Comics #372 (both cover dated February 1968).[5] He turned to animation, doing storyboards for such animated TV series as Courageous Cat and Minute Mouse, and wrote and drew promotional comic books given away to children at the Burger King, Big Boy, and Red Lobster restaurant and fast-food chains, as well as through the Atlanta Braves Major League Baseball team.[21] When Moldoff illustrated a chapter of the Evan Dorkin project Superman and Batman: World's Funnest in 2000, it was his first work for DC Comics in over 30 years.[5]

Moldoff retired to Florida with his wife Shirley.[21] His family included sons Richard Moldoff and Kenneth Moldoff and daughter Ellen Moldoff Stein.[1]

Sheldon Moldoff received an Inkpot Award in 1991.[22]
 
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Davy Jones, British actor and musician (The Monkees), died from a heart attack he was 66


David Thomas Jones  was an English singer-songwriter, musician, actor and businessman best known as a member of the band the Monkees, and for starring in the TV series of the same name died from a heart attack he was 66. His acting credits include a Tony-nominated role as the Artful Dodger in the original London and Broadway productions of Oliver! as well as a starring cameo role in a hallmark episode of The Brady Bunch television show and later reprised parody film; Love, American Style; and My Two Dads. Jones is considered one of the great teen idols.[1][2]

(30 December 1945 – 29 February 2012)

David Thomas Jones was born at 20 Leamington Street, Openshaw, Manchester, Lancashire, England, on 30 December 1945. His television acting debut was on the British television soap opera Coronation Street. He portrayed Colin Lomax, Ena Sharples' grandson, for one episode on 6 March 1961.[3][4] He also appeared in the BBC police series Z-Cars. After the death of his mother from emphysema when he was 14 years old, Jones rejected acting in favour of a career as a jockey, apprenticing with Newmarket trainer Basil Foster.[4] He dropped out of secondary school to begin his career in that field.[5]This career was short-lived, however. Even though Foster believed Jones would be successful as a jockey, he encouraged his young protégé to take a role as the Artful Dodger in a production of Oliver! in London's West End, a move which changed Jones' life forever. In turn, Jones cared for Foster in his later years, bringing him to the United States and providing him financial support.[6]

Foster was approached by a friend who worked in a theatre in the West End of Londonduring casting for the musical Oliver!. Foster replied, "I've got the kid." Jones was cast and appeared to great acclaim as the Artful Dodger.[7] He played the role in London and then on Broadway and was nominated for a Tony Award.[8] On 9 February 1964, he appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show with Georgia Brown who was playing Nancy in the Broadway production of Oliver!. This was the same episode of the show in which the Beatles made their first appearance. Jones said of that night, "I watched the Beatles from the side of the stage, I saw the girls going crazy, and I said to myself, this is it, I want a piece of that."[9]
Following his Ed Sullivan appearance, Jones signed a contract with Ward Sylvester of Screen Gems (then the television division of Columbia Pictures). A pair of American television appearances followed, as Jones received screen time in episodes of Ben Caseyand The Farmer's Daughter.[10]
Jones debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 in the week of 14 August 1965, with the single "What Are We Going To Do?" The 19-year-old singer was signed to Colpix Records, a label owned by Columbia.[11] His debut album David Jones, on the same label, followed soon after (CP493).[12] In 1967 the album was issued in the UK, in mono only, on the Pye Records label (NPL 18178).[13]

From 1966 to 1971, Jones was a member of the Monkees, a pop-rock group formed expressly for a television show of the same name. With Screen Gems producing the series, Jones was shortlisted for auditions, as he was the only Monkee who was signed to a deal with the studio, but still had to meet producers Bob Rafelson's and Bert Schneider's standards.[14]Jones sang lead vocals on many of the Monkees' recordings, including "I Wanna Be Free" and "Daydream Believer".[14] The DVD release of the first season of the show contained commentary from the various bandmates. In Peter Tork's commentary, he stated that Jones was a good drummer and had the live performance lineups been based solely on playing ability, it should have been Tork on guitar, Mike Nesmith on bass, and Jones on drums, with Micky Dolenz taking the fronting role, rather than as it was done (with Nesmith on guitar, Tork on bass, and Dolenz on drums). Mostly playing tambourine or maracas, Jones filled in briefly for Tork on bass when he played keyboards.
Early photo of the Monkees
The NBC television series the Monkees was popular, and remained in syndication. After the group disbanded in 1971, Jones reunited with Micky Dolenz as well as Monkees songwriters Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart in 1974 as a short-lived group called Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart.[14]
A Monkees television show marathon ("Pleasant Valley Sunday") broadcast on 23 February 1986 by MTV resulted in a wave of Monkeemania not seen since the group's heyday. Jones reunited with Dolenz and Peter Tork from 1986 to 1989 to celebrate the band's renewed success and promote the 20th anniversary of the group. A new top 20 hit, "That Was Then, This Is Now" was released (though Jones did not perform on the song) as well as an album, Pool It!.[14]
Monkees activity ceased until 1996 when Jones reunited with Dolenz, Tork and Michael Nesmith to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the band. The group released a new album entitled Justus, the first album since 1967's Headquarters that featured the band members performing all instrumental duties. It was the last time all four Monkees performed together.[14]
In February 2011, Jones confirmed rumours of another Monkees reunion. "There's even talk of putting the Monkees back together again in the next year or so for a U.S. and UK tour," he told Disney's Backstage Pass newsletter. "You're always hearing all those great songs on the radio, in commercials, movies, almost everywhere."[15] The tour (Jones's last) came to fruition entitled, An Evening with The Monkees: The 45th Anniversary Tour.[16]
Jones is the next closest member of the Monkees (to Micky Dolenz) who had worked with the band since its inception. The exceptions have been the new songs recorded in 1986 and since his untimely death

In 1967, Jones opened his first store, called Zilch, at 217 Thompson Street in the Greenwich Village section of New York City. The store sold "hip" clothing and accessories and also allowed customers to design their own clothes.[citation needed]
After the Monkees officially disbanded in 1971, Jones kept himself busy by establishing a New York City-style street market in Los Angeles, called "The Street" which cost approximately $40,000.[17] He also collaborated with musical director Doug Trevor on a one-hour ABC television special entitled Pop Goes Davy Jones, which featured new artists The Jackson 5 and the Osmonds.[17]
Bell Records, then having a string of hits with The Partridge Family, signed Jones to a somewhat inflexible solo record contract in 1971.[17] Jones was not allowed to choose his songs or producer, resulting in several lacklustre and aimless records.[17] His second solo album, Davy Jones (1971) was notable for the song "Rainy Jane", which reached No.52 in the Billboardcharts. To promote the album, Jones performed "Girl" on an episode of The Brady Bunchentitled "Getting Davy Jones".[17] Although the single sold poorly, the popularity of Jones's appearance on the show resulted in "Girl" becoming his best-remembered solo hit, even though it was not included in the album. The final single, "I'll Believe In You"/"Road to Love," was poorly received.[17]

Thanks in part to reruns of The Monkees on Saturday mornings and in syndication, The Monkees Greatest Hits charted in 1976. The LP, issued by Arista (a subsidiary of Screen Gems), was actually a repackaging of a 1972 compilation LP called Refocus that had been issued by Arista's previous label imprint, Bell Records, also owned by Screen Gems.
Dolenz and Jones took advantage of this, joining ex-Monkees songwriters Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart to tour the United States. From 1975 to 1977, as the "Golden Hits of The Monkees" show ("The Guys who Wrote 'Em and the Guys who Sang 'Em!"), they successfully performed in smaller venues such as state fairs and amusement parks as well as making stops in Japan, Thailand, and Singapore, (though they couldn't use the Monkees name for legal reasons). They also released an album of new material appropriately as Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart, additionally a live album Concert in Japan was released by Capitol in 1976).
Mike Nesmith had not been interested in a reunion (due largely to his dislike of touring). Peter Tork claimed later that he had not been asked, which agreed with what one of the CD booklets stated that they simply didn't know where he was at that time. Although a Christmas single (credited to Micky Dolenz, Davy Jones and Peter Tork) was produced by former Monkee producer Chip Douglas and released on his own label in 1976. The single featured Douglas's and Howard Kaylan's "Christmas Is My Time of Year" (originally recorded by a 1960s supergroup, Christmas Spirit), with a B-side of Irving Berlin's "White Christmas" (Douglas released a remixed version of the single, with additional overdubbed instruments, in 1986). Tork also joined Dolenz, Jones, Boyce & Hart on stage at Disneyland on July 4, 1976, and also joined Dolenz and Jones on stage at the Starwood in Hollywood, California in 1977.

Jones also continued acting after the Monkees, either as himself or another character.
He returned to theatre several times after the Monkees. 1977 saw him performing with former band-mate Micky Dolenz in a stage production of the Harry Nilsson musical The Point! in London at the Mermaid Theatre, playing and singing the starring role of "Oblio" to Dolenz' roles as the "Count's Kid" and the "Leafman", (according to the CD booklet). An original cast recording was made and released. The comedic chemistry of Jones and Dolenz proved so strong that the show was revived in 1978 with Nilsson inserting additional comedy for the two, plus two more songs, with one of them ("Gotta Get Up") being sung by Jones and Dolenz. The show was considered so good that it was planned to be revived again in 1979 but it proved cost prohibitive (source CD booklet "Harry Nilsson's The Point").[17] Jones also appeared in several productions of Oliver! as the Artful Dodger, and in 1989 toured the US portraying "Fagin".
He appeared in two episodes each of Love, American Style and My Two Dads.[17] Jones also appeared in animated form as himself in 1972 in an hour-long episode of The New Scooby-Doo Movies.[17] Other television appearances include Sledge Hammer!, Boy Meets World, Hey Arnold!, The Single Guy (where he is mistaken for Dudley Moore) and Sabrina, the Teenage Witch in which he sang "Daydream Believer" to Sabrina (Melissa Joan Hart) as well as (I'll) Love You Forever.[14]
Much more intriguingly in 1995 Jones played in a notable episode of the sitcom "Boy Meets World". His two former fellow Monkees Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork had already appeared separately as characters on previous episodes. Suddenly in episode eight of the 3rd season (titled "Rave On"), all three former-Monkees turn up, although they did not play the Monkees per se (Davy Jones is "Reginald Fairfield", while Dolenz is "Gordy" and Tork is "Jedidiah Lawrence"). Much of the comedy of the show is thrown to Jones. However at the climax of the program the three are put on stage together and perform the classic Buddy Holly song "Not Fade Away", and the Temptations "My Girl". As in inside-joke, actor Dave Madden who'd played the manager on "The Partridge Family" cameoed as a manager who suddenly appeared wanting to handle the "new" group telling them that they "could be bigger than the Beatles". Purportedly both ex-Monkee Mike Nesmithand Pattie Boyd ex-wife of Beatle George Harrison were in attendance at the taping. (per IMDB entry "Boy Meets World" episode "Rave On").
In 2009, Jones made a cameo appearance as himself in the SpongeBob SquarePants episode "SpongeBob SquarePants vs. The Big One" (his appearance was meant to be a pun on Davy Jones' Locker).[14]
Despite his initial high-profile after the end of the Monkees, Jones struggled to establish himself as a solo artist. Glenn A. Baker, author of Monkeemania: The True Story of the Monkees, commented in 1986 that "for an artist as versatile and confident as (Davy) Jones, the relative failure of his post-Monkees activities is puzzling. For all his cocky predictions to the press about his future plans, Davy fell into a directionless heap when left to his own devices."[17]
The continued popularity of his 1971 Brady Bunch appearance led to his being cast as himself in The Brady Bunch Movie. Jones sang his signature solo hit "Girl", with a grunge band providing backing,[14] this time with middle-aged women swooning over him.[14] Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork also appeared alongside Jones as judges.[14]

On 21 June 1997, during a concert at the Los Angeles Coliseum, Jones joined U2's The Edge onstage for a karaoke performance of "Daydream Believer," which had become a fixture of the band's set during that year's PopMart Tour.[18]
In 2001, Jones released Just Me, an album of his own songs, some written for the album and others originally on Monkees releases.[19] In the early 2000s he was performing in the Flower Power Concert Series during Epcot's Flower and Garden Festival, a yearly gig he would continue until his death.[20][21]
In April 2006, Jones recorded the single "Your Personal Penguin",[22] written by children's author Sandra Boynton, as a companion piece to her new board book of the same title.[23] On 1 November 2007, the Boynton book and CD titled Blue Moo was released and Jones is featured in both the book and CD, singing "Your Personal Penguin". In 2009, Jones released a collection of classics and standards from the 1940s through the 1970s entitled She.
In December 2008, Yahoo! Music named Jones the "Number 1 teen idol of all time".[1] In 2009, Jones was rated second in a list of 10 best teen idols compiled by Fox News Channel.[24]

Jones was married three times. In December 1968, he married Dixie Linda Haines, with whom he had been living. Their relationship had been kept out of the public eye until after the birth of their first child in October 1968. It caused a considerable backlash for Jones from his fans when it was finally made public. Jones later stated in Tiger Beat magazine, "I kept my marriage a secret because I believe stars should be allowed a private life."[17] Jones and Haines had two daughters: Talia Elizabeth (born 2 October 1968) and Sarah Lee (born 3 July 1971). The marriage ended in 1975.[25]
Jones married his second wife Anita Pollinger on 24 January 1981, and also had two daughters with her – Jessica Lillian (born 4 September 1981) and Annabel Charlotte (born 26 June 1988). They divorced in 1996 during the Monkees' 30th Anniversary reunion tour.[25] Jones married for a third time on 30 August 2009 to Jessica Pacheco, 32 years his junior.[26]This was Pacheco's third marriage as well.[citation needed] On 28 July 2011, Pacheco filed to divorce Jones in Miami-Dade County, Florida, but dropped the suit in October.[citation needed] They were still married when he died in February 2012. Pacheco was omitted from Jones' will, which he made before their marriage. His oldest daughter Talia, who he named his executor, was granted by the court the unusual request that her father's will be sealed, on the basis that "planning documents and financial affairs as public opinion could have a material effect on his copyrights, royalties and ongoing goodwill."[27]

In addition to his career as an entertainer, Jones' other first love was horses. Training as a jockey in his teens, Jones later said, "I made one huge mistake. When the Monkees finished in 1969–70, I should have got away from Hollywood and got back into the racing game. Instead I waited another 10 years. Everyone makes mistakes in life and for me that was the biggest."[28] He held an amateur rider's licence and rode in his first race at Newbury in Berkshire, England for trainer Toby Balding.
On 1 February 1996, he won his first race, on Digpast, in the one-mile Ontario Amateur Riders Handicap at Lingfield in Surrey, England.[28] Jones also had horse ownership interests in both the US and the UK, and served as a commercial spokesman for Colonial Downs racetrack in Virginia.[29] In tribute to Jones, Lingfield Park announced that the first two races on the card for 3 March 2012 would be renamed the "Hey Hey We're The Monkees Handicap" and the "In Memory of Davy Jones Selling Stakes" with successful horses in those races accompanied into the Winners' Enclosure by some of the Monkees' biggest hits. Plans were also announced to erect a plaque to commemorate Jones next to a Monkey Puzzle tree on the course.[30]

On the morning of 29 February 2012, Jones went to tend his fourteen horses at a farm in Indiantown, Florida. After riding one of his favourite horses around the track, he complained of chest pains and difficulty breathing and was rushed to Martin Memorial South Hospital in Stuart, Florida, where he was pronounced dead of a severe heart attack resulting from arteriosclerosis.[32][33][34]
On Wednesday, 7 March 2012, a private funeral service was held at Holy Cross Catholic parish in Indiantown, Florida. The three surviving Monkees did not attend in order to avoid drawing attention from the grieving family.[35] Instead, the group attended memorial services in New York City as well as organising their own private memorial in Los Angeles along with Jones's family and close friends. Additionally, a public memorial service was held on 10 March 2012 in Beavertown, Pennsylvania, near a church Jones had purchased for future renovation.[36]
On Monday 12 March, a private memorial service was held in Openshaw, Manchester at Lees Street Congregational Church where Jones performed as a child in church plays.[37] Jones' wife and daughters travelled to England to join his relatives based there for the service, and placed his ashes on his parents' graves for a time.[37]

The news of Jones' death triggered a surge of Internet traffic, causing sales of the Monkees' music to increase dramatically.[39]
Guitarist Michael Nesmith stated that Jones's "spirit and soul live well in my heart, among all the lovely people, who remember with me the good times, and the healing times, that were created for so many, including us. I have fond memories. I wish him safe travels."[40] In an 8 March 2012 interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Nesmith commented, "For me, David was the Monkees. They were his band. We were his side men."[38] Bassist Peter Tork said, "Adios to the Manchester Cowboy", and speaking to CNN, drummer/singer Micky Dolenz said, "He was the brother I never had and this leaves a gigantic hole in my heart".[41] Dolenz claimed that he knew something bad was about to happen and said "Can't believe it.. Still in shock.. had bad dreams all night long."[42] Dolenz was gratified by the public affection expressed for both Jones and the Monkees in the wake of his bandmate's death. "He was a very well-known and well-loved character and person. There are a lot of people who are grieving pretty hard. The Monkees obviously had a following, and so did (Jones) on his own. So I'm not surprised, but I was flattered and honored to be considered one of his friends and a cohort in Monkee business."[43]
Monkees co-creator Bob Rafelson commented that Jones "deserves a lot of credit, let me tell you. He may not have lived as long as we wanted him to, but he survived about seven lifetimes, including being perhaps the biggest rock star of his time."[44]
Brady Bunch co-star Maureen McCormick commented that "Davy was a beautiful soul," and that he "spread love and goodness around the world. He filled our lives with happiness, music, and joy. He will live on in our hearts forever. May he rest in peace."[45]
Yahoo! Music commented that Jones's death "hit so many people so hard" because "Monkees nostalgia cuts across generations: from the people who discovered the band during their original 1960s run; to the kids who came of age watching 1970s reruns; to the twenty- and thirtysomethings who discovered the Monkees when MTV (a network that owes much to the Monkees' influence) began airing old episodes in 1986."[2][46]
Time magazine contributor James Poniewozik praised the Monkees' classic sitcom, and Jones in particular, saying "even if the show never meant to be more than entertainment and a hit-single generator, we shouldn’t sell The Monkees short. It was far better television than it had to be; during an era of formulaic domestic sitcoms and wacky comedies, it was a stylistically ambitious show, with a distinctive visual style, absurdist sense of humour and unusual story structure. Whatever Jones and the Monkees were meant to be, they became creative artists in their own right, and Jones's chipper Brit-pop presence was a big reason they were able to produce work that was commercial, wholesome and yet impressively weird."[47]
Mediaite columnist Paul Levinson noted that "The Monkees were the first example of something created in a medium – in this case, a rock group on television – that jumped off the screen to have big impact in the real world."[48]

Film
YearTitleRoleNotes
1968HeadDavyCredited as David Jones
1972Treasure IslandJim HawkinsVoice
1974Oliver TwistThe Artful DodgerVoice
1995The Brady Bunch MovieHimself
2007SexinaSingerAlternative title: Sexina: Popstar P.I.
2011Goldberg P.I.Davy JonesAlternative title: Jackie Goldberg Private Dick
Television
YearTitleRoleNotes
1960BBC Sunday-Night Play
Episode: "Summer Theatre: June Evening"
1961Coronation StreetColin LomasEpisode #1.25
Credited as David Jones
1962Z-CarsVarious roles3 episodes
Credited as David Jones
1964"The Ed Sullivan Show"Cast of Oliver!Appeared on same episode as The Beatles on 9 February 1964
1965Ben CaseyGregg CarterEpisode: "If You Play Your Cards Right, You Too Can Be a Loser"
Credited as David Jones
1966The Farmer's DaughterRolandEpisode: "Moe Hill and the Mountains"
Credited as David Jones
1966 to 1968The MonkeesDavy58 episodes
Credited as David Jones
1969Rowan & Martin's Laugh-InGuest performerEpisode #2.19
1970Make Room for GranddaddyHimselfEpisode: "The Teen Idol"
1970 to 1973Love, American StyleVarious roles2 episodes
1971The Brady BunchDavy JonesEpisode: "Getting Davy Jones"
Credited as David Jones
1972The New Scooby-Doo MoviesHimself (Voice)Episode: "The Haunted Horseman in Hagglethorn Hall"
1977The Wonderful World of DisneyDavey SandersEpisode: "The Bluegrass Special"
1979Horse in the HouseFrank Tyson2 episodes
1986New Love, American Style
Episode: "Love-a-Gram/Love and the Apartment"
1988Sledge Hammer!Jerry VicunaEpisode: "Sledge, Rattle 'n' Roll"
1988–1989My Two DadsMalcolm O'Dell2 episodes
1991ABC Afterschool SpecialAlbert LynchEpisode: "It's Only Rock & Roll"
1991TrainerSteve MoorcroftEpisode: "No Way to Treat a Lady"
1992Herman's HeadHimselfEpisode: "The One Where They Go on the Love Boat"
1995Boy Meets WorldReginald FairfieldEpisode: "Rave On"
1996Lush LifeJohnny JamesEpisode: "The Not So Lush Rock Star"
1996The Single GuyHimselfEpisode: "Davy Jones"
1997Sabrina, the Teenage WitchHimselfEpisode: "Dante's Inferno"
2002Hey Arnold!Himself (Voice)Episode: "Gerald's Game/Fishing Trip"
2009SpongeBob SquarePantsHimselfEpisode: "SpongeBob SquarePants vs. The Big One"
2011The Dreamsters: Welcome to the DreameryDavy JonesTelevision movie
2011Phineas and FerbNigel (voice)Episode: "Bad Hair Day/Meatloaf Surprise"

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Jones' eponymous 1971 album
DateLabel/Catalogue #TitlesBillboardTop AlbumsCash BoxTOP 100 AlbumsNotes
1965Colpix CP-493 (mono) / Colpix SCP-493 (stereo)David Jones
185
73
(US) Credited as "David Jones"
1967Pye NPL 18178 (mono)David Jones
 –
 –
(UK) Credited as "David Jones"
June 1971Bell 6067Davy Jones
205
 –

November 1976
Christmas Jones
 –
 –

January 1978MCA MCF2826The Point
 –
 –
Jones sings most of the songs on this original cast recording of Harry Nilsson's stage performance of "The Point!". Album was initially released in Britain only, followed by a release in Japan.
June 1981Japan JAL-1003Davy Jones Live
 –
 –
Released in Japan only.
March 1982Pioneer K-10025Hello Davy (Davy Jones Live)
 –
 –
Released in Japan only. According to some sources, this is an unauthorised LP release, with the audio having been lifted from the Japanese-released LaserDisc of this concert.
1987
Incredible Revisited
 –
 –

Singles[edit]

DateLabel & numberTitles (A-side, B-side)
Both sides from same album except where indicated
US
Hot 100
US
Cashbox
AUNotesAlbum
February 1965Colpix 764"Dream Girl"
b/w "Take Me To Paradise" (Non-album track)
 –
 –
 7
Credited as "David Jones"[49]David Jones
July 1965Colpix 784"What Are We Going To Do?"
b/w "This Bouquet"
93
94
 88
Credited as "Mr. David Jones"[50]
October 1965Colpix 793"The Girl From Chelsea"
b/w "Theme For A New Love" (from David Jones)
 –
 –
 4
Credited as "David Jones"Non-album track
1967Pye 17302"It Ain't Me Babe"
b/w "Baby It's Me"
 –
 –
 56
Credited as "Davy Jones"; Released in the U.K. only.David Jones
May 1971Bell 986"Do It In The Name Of Love"
b/w "Lady Jane"
 –
 –
 –
By Micky Dolenz and Davy Jones.Non-album tracks
June 1971Bell 45111"Rainy Jane"
b/w "Welcome To My Love"
52
32
 78

Davy Jones
October 1971Bell 45136"I Really Love You"
b/w "Sittin' In The Apple Tree"
107
98
 –

November 1971Bell 45159"Girl"
b/w "Take My Love" (from Davy Jones)
 –
 –
 –
A-side featured in The Brady Bunchepisode "Getting Davy Jones".Non-album tracks
January 1972Bell 45178"I'll Believe In You"
b/w "Road To Love" (from Davy Jones)
 –
 –
 –

1972MGM 14458"Who Was It?"
b/w "You're A Lady"
 –
 –
 –
Jones sang "You're A Lady" in Japanese on a Japan MGM 45 in 1972.
1973MGM 14524"Rubberene"
b/w "Rubberene"
 –
 –
 –
This single was released as a promotional copy only.
May 1978Warner Brothers 17161"(Hey Ra Ra Ra) Happy Birthday Mickey Mouse"
b/w "You Don't Have to Be A Country Boy To Sing A Country Song"
 –
 –
 –
Issued in Britain only to commemorate Mickey Mouse's 50th Birthday
May 1981Japan 2007"It's Now"
b/w "How Do You Know" (fromLive In Japan)
 –
 –
 –
Released in Japan only.Hello Davy/Davy Jones Live
June 1981Japan 2010"Dance Gypsy"
b/w "Can She Do It (Like She Dances)"
 –
 –
 –
Released in Japan only.
March 1982Pioneer 1517"Sixteen (Baby, You'll Soon Be Sixteen)"
b/w "Baby Holdout"
 –
 –
 –
Released in Japan only.
December 1984JJ 2001"I'll Love You Forever"
b/w "When I Look Back On Christmas"
 –
 –
 –
Released in Britain only. A-side recorded in 1979; B-side recorded in 1976.Non-album tracks
1987Powderworks374"After Your Heart"
b/w "Hippy Hippy Shake"
 –
 –
 –
Released in Australia only. A-side recorded in October 1981; B-side recorded in 1987.

  • They Made a Monkee Out of Me, autobiography (print book) by Davy Jones, Dome PR, 1987, ISBN 978-0-9618614-0-7.
  • They Made a Monkee Out of Me: Davy Jones Reads His Autobiography, (audiobook), Dove Entertainment Inc (November 1988).
  • Daydream Believin, Hercules Promotions, First Edition, ISBN 0-9618614-1-X (2000)
  • "Mutant Monkees Meet the Masters of the Multimedia Manipulation Machine!" Written with Alan Green, Click! Publishing, First Edition, 1992, (softcover) ISBN 0-9631235-0-5

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